12/3/09

Win an ARC of a Conspiracy of Kings, by Megan Whalen Turner!

This contest is now closed--the winner is Free Narnian! (please contact me so I can send it off to you!)

I am giving away my ARC of A Conspiracy of Kings. To enter, please leave a recommendation for a book that us fans of Megan Whalen Turner would enjoy, and at the end, I'll compile them (unless I won't, because of their being too many), and we'll have a nicely tidy list of things to read while we wait for March, and to fill the empty years while we wait for Book Five...

I will leave this contest open until next Monday, December 7th (which should give my husband time to finish reading it, and me to read it again). The contest will close at the end of day, 11:59 pm.

And I will ship internationally.

Here's the list of books that resulted!

87 comments:

  1. Patricia McKillip's Riddle-Master trilogy. Or, frankly, anything else by her. Winter Rose (a variation on Tam Lin) and In the Forests of Serre (inspired by the Firebird legend) are two of my favorites.

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  2. Brent Weeks' Night Angel Trilogy, starting with The Way of Shadows. His world-building is fantastic, he delves into the complicated politics like MWT, but also like her, the characters are core. The main character actually is a street urchin (instead of pretending he was one ;) ) and it's about assassins rather than thieves, but who doesn't love assassins?

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  3. The Miles Vorkosigan books by Lois McMaster Bujold are my favourite books along with MWT's. She writes such awesome characters.

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  4. The Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett, my favourite books of all time feauturing a brilliant but tortured hero and plenty of political intrigue. They're a challenging read but I can't rec them highly enough.

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  5. Elizabeth E. Wein's THE WINTER PRINCE reminded me of the Turner series, with political intrigue, beautiful prose, and nuanced characters. There are several other companion books that I have not yet acquired but am eager to read as well.

    Can't wait to see the final list of suggestions! I have the Lymond books on my to-read stack already!

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  6. Tamora Pierce's Tortall books. I'm particularly fond of the original Alanna quartet, but the closest to MWT in terms of content is probably the Trickster duo, with spies, thieves, court politics, and interfering gods.

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  7. I'll second the Pierce Trickster books recommendation, along with the Miles Vorkosigan recommendation. Miles and Kyprioth both remind me of Gen.

    Patricia Briggs' Mercedes Thompson series, about a skinwalker who shifts into coyote form, puts me in mind of Gen as well. Mercedes has a flexible mind, like Gen.

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  8. Hmmmm...

    I've only read one book by this author, but I was very impressed with Rosemary Sutcliff's writing. I read The Shining Company, which was good but dark; I'm pretty sure her other books have got to be good as well. The prose was well-crafted and the characters were complex, though the plot wasn't as twisty as an MWT plot.

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  9. I'm going to go with Kidnapped, by Robert Louis Stevenson. Alan Breck and Gen are long-lost relatives (down to the Scottish accent!)

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  10. With Turner, it's all about good writing, so I'll suggest an older book, Margaret Mahy's Changeover, because it's also very well written. (It's an early, superior example of a YA paranormal.) Or I might suggest Sherwood Smith's Crown Duel, which isn't quite as well crafted as Turner's books, but whose plot and characters carried me happily along.

    McKillip and Bujold are remarkably good writers, so I'm glad to see them named here.

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  11. The King Raven trilogy by Stephen Lawhead, Hood, Scarlet, and Tuck .
    The legend of Robin Hood set in Medieval Wales, it's a really wonderful retelling that follows the basic plot while adding a new insight into the legend. Every so often this Robin Hood (Rhi Bran in Welsh) reminds me of Gen.<3

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  12. This book won't come out in the States until January, but Incarceron by Catherine Fisher is one I could see fans liking. It has a good mix of political intrigue, action, and excellent world-building. For me, MWT is all about the characters and about providing a story that is much deeper and twistier then it initially appears, and this book fits in that mold.

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  13. Sarah Rees Brennan's The Demon's Lexicon Which is the only other book for which I belong to an LJ community that I don't write fanfiction for. Well written, witty, fast paced, and with a punch to the gut ending with just the right amount of foreshadowing. Brennan is like Turner, one of the few writers who can really pull off a surprise ending. Unfortunately, it's the first in a trilogy, and the second doesn't come out until June, but oh well.

    The Westmark Trilogy by Lloyd Alexander deconstructs fantasy tropes magnificently, and it's full of court intrigue, revolutionaries, infighting, war, betrayel, and realistic well thought out political maneuvering. It gets at the philosophical heart of much high fantasy in the same way MWT's books do with the Gogs and Goddesses. There's also no magic, so it has a similar feel to the Thief books.

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  14. 'The Lies of Locke Lamora' by Scott Lynch and its sequel 'Red Seas Under Red Skies'. The main character, Locke, is a similar thief to Eugenides but due to his upbringing (and not having a Eddis or father) is a much rougher and dangerous sort. The worldbuilding is fantastic in these novels, the politics rich and intriguing and the characters are vividly drawn that you can't help but want to desperately know what happens to them next.

    And on a sidenote - I've been watching 'White Collar' on the USA network recently and the main character is a charming con man, who frequently exasperates those around him with his tricks - but they love him for it, and I thought that was a very Gen sort of thing. It's a fun, breezy caper sort of series and I highly recommend it as well.

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  15. They're intended for younger kids, but how about Regarding the Fountain: A Tale In Letters of Liars and Leaks by Kate and Sarah Klise.

    I'm recommending it because of the way the plot fits together in the end of all of the books in this series.

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  16. Patrick Rothfuss's The Name of the Wind. Much longer than Turner's books, and it's the first book of a yet-to-be-finished trilogy, but the main character is remarkably similar to a young, cynical Gen. There is some thievery, and it's one of the most impressive books I've read in ages.

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  17. I rather enjoyed the His Dark Materials trilogy, mostly because it was so character-driven (especially The Subtle Knife).

    And of course, Percy Jackson and the Olympians would very much appeal to Sounisians, I think.

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  18. I think I'll pull out Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card. I can highly recommend Rosemary's Sutcliffe's Mark of the Horse Lord. In the beginning of KofA, Costis echoes a line from the end of this book and it's a lot of fun to run into it.

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  19. Night Watch by Terry Pratchett. Of course it's better if you've read the other City Watch books first, but it also works beautifully on it's own.

    There's some political machinations, but the story is primarily about Sam Vimes (one of my all time favorite characters) dealing with a city poised to explode into violence.

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  20. Sherwood Smith's "Crown Duel" is fabulous—battles, misguided heroine, mysterious marquis, political intrigue, a hint of magic... Pretty much everything you could ever want in a novel. :-)

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  21. I would have recommended a number of the books people have already suggested, so here are a few others:

    The Curse of Chalion by Lois McMaster Bujold (along with its sequel, Paladin of Souls, not to mention the Sharing Knife series), Acacia by David Anthony Durham, and - if you're nuts enough to start an unfinished series set in a world where no one is safe and few people are as easily defined as they might at first seem - George RR Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series. (Note: Only the Bujolds would be considered YA.)

    Oh, and in scifi (which I figure is fair game, since my beloved Miles has been mentioned), Tinker, by Wen Spencer.

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  22. I really love Catherine Gilbert Murdoch's books: Dairy Queen, Off Season, and Front and Center. Wonderful, wonderful characters.

    They're about a teen girl dairyfarmer who plays football and her somewhat dysfunctional family. I personally hate sports, so when I say I loved these books, you know they're about a lot more than football.

    I also love Ellen Emerson White's books. Her President's daughter series have recently been re-released, I think.

    The President's Daughter
    White House Autumn
    Long Live the Queen (Winner: ALA Best Book for Young Adults)
    Long May She Reign

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  23. Diana Wynne Jones! (I don't see her on the list yet; if I missed something, my apologies.) Howl's Moving Castle is the obvious one, but I think MWT's fans would enjoy the Dalemark Quartet and Deep Secret as well.

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  24. If the Nightrunner Series by Lynn Flewelling hasn't been said yet, I'd go with that. That's one of my favourites for fantasy/politics/thievery rolled in one.

    Or, failing that, anything by Neil Gaiman but especially Anansi Boys- about the son of a trickster god.

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  25. I'd recommend The Blue Sword by Robin McKinley. She is an amazing author.

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  26. The Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Stroud. Delightfully snarky humor, magic, political intrigue, and dynamic characters who make sometimes unpredictable choices.

    The Temeraire series by Naomi Novik. The Napoleonic Wars--with dragons! Great, relatable characters in amazing situations, more political intrigue, fun history revisionism, superb and exciting character development for everyone involved, and tactical/warfare scenes written in a way that is suspenseful and engaging (not usually my cup of tea, so this is really saying something).

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  27. The Girl Genius series by Phil and Kaja Foglio. The series itself is a webcomic though it does have collected volumes, which currently numbers eight. The main character is a lovely blend of strong sympathetic heroine and mad scientist. The main romance especially reminds me of MWT as the lovers in question have both political obstacles and trust issues. The comic can be found by clicking on this finely crafted link: http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20021104

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  28. The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch. Locke, like Eugenides, is a thief--a very, very good one. Lynch's world is quite different from Turner's, but it's equally impressive.

    Also, The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak. Similar to Turner's work in that the prose is gorgeous. (And there is some thievery...)

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  29. Sherwood Smith's Crown and Court Duet and then the prequel, Stranger to Command, or if you have lots of reading time, the Inda quartet, and Martha Wells (anything by). As well as many of the others already mentioned here!

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  30. Turner's genius for excellent characters is what keeps me coming back for more and another book that does that for me regarding great characters is Dune by Frank Herbert.

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  31. My favorite part of her books is her ability to weave twists and turns into the plot that are both unexpected and yet entirely plausible. With tht in mind, I'd recommend Life of Pi by Yann Martel would be my recommendation.

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  32. The Vorkosigan books by Lois McMaster Bujold. These books have an amazing cast of characters, intriguing plots, and amazing writing. Miles' forward momentum often reminds me of Gen.

    The Chalion books, also by Bujold. The gods in this book and their relationship with humans are particularly well done.

    Anything by Terry Pratchett, particularly the City Watch books.

    Goose Chase by Kindl. It's an interesting twist on typical fairy tales, and the voice of the main character reminds me of Gen.

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  33. I see lots of books that I recommend already on the list, so here's what I think is a new one. It isn't fantasy, but it has an extremely unreliable narrator (read: compulsive liar) whom I love to bits.

    Last Days of Summer, Steve Kluger

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  34. There have been a lot of great recs along but can not resist the prize ( and thanks so much for being willing to ship internationally!)

    I endorse the recommendation for Lymond, on a different tone than MWT but oh so complex and really Lymond is just as maddening and fascinating as Gen (and vice versa). In their own different ways!

    On a different YA tone, and a very feminine book, I recommend Sharon Shinn´s Summers at Castle Auburn. Her books are a bit hit and miss with me, but Summers at Castle Auburn is the one book of hers I adore, and which everybody seems to love as well - well, I would not recommend it to somebody who loves military sf or something, but anybody who might be charmed by a story about princesses (though really it is not about that..)

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  35. Wildwood Dancing by Juliet Marillier. Beautiful prose, an unconventional love story, a sensible heroine, and a villain who will make you want to scream with anger. This was one of the best books I've read this year.

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  36. THE OUTLAWS OF SHERWOOD by Robin McKinley

    THE SONG OF ALBION TRILOGY by Stephen R. Lawhead

    THE EAGLE OF THE NINTH by Rosemary Sutcliff

    Especially for readers of historical fiction, and those who like the historical flare in Turner's writing.

    Thanks for having this contest!

    -FreeNarnian

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  37. I'm loving the recs. I'd second the Tamora Pierce rec (Song of the Lioness quartet especially) and add my voice to the chorus recommending the Miles Vorkosigan series.

    For a new one (I'm struggling here because all my favourites have been mentioned!), I'll suggest a different Wen Spencer series - her Ukiah Oregon books, which is SF and wonderfully addictive too.

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  38. Till We Have Faces by C. S. Lewis. This one would be for the older fans. It seems like a straight foward enough story, until the twist at the end. There are gods and queens and small kingdom politics. Willow, read more Rosemary Sutcliff books. She is my favorite historical fiction writer. The Lantern Bearers, and The Mark of the Horse Lord are excellent.

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  39. Wren's Quest, Wren to the Rescue, and Wren's War by Sherwood Smith

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  40. A lot of the books I love have already been recommended, but my favourite new book of the year is the second one I'll mention. Ya'll should read N.D. Wilson's 100 Cupboards and Dandelion Fire. Fantastic stuff! I feel like I should be able to give a more detailed summary beyond superlatives, but... I'm not sure I can.

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  41. Dune series by Frank Herbert (legendary stuff)
    Any and all works by Neil Gaiman ('American Gods' is very dark, 'Anansi Boys' is lighter but still somewhat dark, 'Neverwhere' is just a fantastic romp in underground London)
    Discworld series by Terry Pratchett - there are a LOT of books in this series but each book is a pleasure to read, and 'Nightwatch' is the crown jewel that makes you feel privileged to have read something so utterly great. If you find his eclectic, frenetic style a little distracting then you can start out with the Tiffany Aching series to warm up before diving into the deep end with 'Color of Magic' (the first book).
    'Jonathan Strange and Mr. Norrell'
    - a exhausting, exhaustive book but truly well worth the time invested. If Jane Austen was badass enough to write gutsy fantasy, this would be it.
    The Earthsea Trilogy by Ursula K. LeGuin (though she has expanded the series) - a good deal more philosophical and painstaking in its plot progression than the usual fantasy fare but haunting and beautiful.
    'The Belgariad' by David Eddings, just a really great, fun read - followed by 'The Malloreon' which isn't as good but you just HAVE to keep reading because you love the characters so much.
    And this is closer to science fiction, but David Wyndham's 'The Chrysalids' is amazingly well-written.

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  42. Maria and Deirdre from Mt. Kisco LibraryDecember 3, 2009 at 5:46 PM

    The Wolf Brother Series by Michelle Paver, has great characters, a marvelous extended plot, and a bit of magic.


    An author who writes great female characters is Kristin Cashore. Her books Graceling and Fire are both excellent.

    Walter Miller's A Canticle for Leibowitz is a post apocalyptic story.

    And lastly, Kate Thompson's The New Policeman.

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  43. I would love to be entered in your draw. Thanks. wandanamgreb(at)gmail(dot)com

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  44. My current favorite is The Good Thief by Hannah Tinti. It obviously involves thievery which I must admit is what attracted me to it in the first place, but it turned out to be excellent. The writing beautiful an witty. I was up all night because I could not stop reading.

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  45. I really enjoyed Howl's Moving Castle. Sometimes Howl reminds me of Gen when he's in his moody phases. :D

    I'm so crossing my fingers to win!

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  46. "Shiver" by Maggie Stiefvater (My fourth favorite book after MWT's!)
    "Candor" by Pam Bachorz
    "Graceling" by Kristin Cashore
    Shannon Hale's "Books of Bayern" (Goose Girl)
    Lastly, "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee. I usually like fantasy better, but I loved this one.

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  47. The Sherwood Ring by Elizabeth Pope. The main character has always reminded me a little of Gen.

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  48. I agree with an earlier post recommending THE BLUE SWORD by Robin McKinley, and I'd also suggest her THE HERO AND THE CROWN.

    Other books MWT fans might enjoy are Lorna Freeman's COVENANTS and Sherwood Smith's INDA. Both excellent books.

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  49. Robin Hobb's Assassins Trilogy and Tawny Man Trilogy both star Fitz, who has some Gen-like qualities, and happen to be amazing sets of books. The Liveship Trilogy goes in between them, and is also fantastic.

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  50. — Margaret Lovett's "The Great and Terrible Quest"

    fantastic book...though I think it may be out of print.

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  51. Robin Hobbs - The Assassin's Apprentice. If you like it there are 2 more books in that series. Then there are 2 other trilogies to follow that. Really quite brilliant.

    Also the Lymond Chronicles by Dorothy Dunnett, that someone early on had recommended, is a must. He,like Eugenides, is a character you can't forget.

    Oh, and The Sparrow and it's sequel by Mary Doria Russell. So moving and substantial. All of these are books I've come back to repeatedly - just like Meg Whalen's.

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  52. I'm sorry that this author has already been mentioned, but she is so good I can't resist bringing her up again.
    Dianna Wynne Jones is an author that MWT herself recommends (In the extras in the back of The Thief, if you have the right addition.) All of her books are unpredictable and original. Nothing is ever what it seems. Everybody has heard of Howl's Moving Castle, but she has written other stuff besides our beloved Howl, including sequels: Castle in the Air, and House of Many Ways. Both of which are just as clever and hilarious as the first Howl.
    One of the funniest she's ever written is Tough Guide to Fantasyland, an encyclopedia of all fantasy cliches (The girl disguised as a boy, the "Reek of Wrongness," The youth that saves the world, etc.) You'll clear 3/4 of all fantasy books just by reading this. My other favorites by her are The Chrestmonci Chronicles. I don't know how to describe this series, because every book is so different, but they're awesome.
    I even will go as far to say that Jones is MWT's equal in writing and brilliancy. MWT herself loves Jones, and there is no better reason to read Dianna Wynne Jones than that. Sorry I ranted...I shall shut up now...

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  53. Besides anything by Diana Wynne Jones, I'd recommend several of Patricia Wrede's books. I especially like Magician's Ward, about a pickpocket in a magical period London, and Snow-White and Rose Red, a retelling of the fairy tale.

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  54. Hawksong by Amelia Atwater Rhodes
    It's a lovely story about two monarchs coming together (in marriage for the sake of their kingdoms)
    Truth About Forever by Sarah Dessen
    East by Edith Pattou

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  55. House of the Scorpions by Nancy Farmer
    Ines of My Soul by Isabella Allende
    Are two spectacular reads!

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  56. I most definitely have to mention the Bloody Jack series by L.A. Meyer, which, while none of the characters overtly reminds me of MWT's characters, nevertheless reminds me overall of her genre by consisting of historical fiction (though in this case, it's real Napoleonic history, not alternate universe), intriguing and well-developed characters, adventure, a measure of international politics, and of course good writing.

    I'll also mention The Snow Queen by Joan D. Vinge, which is a science fiction rewrite of the traditional Norse fairytale of the same name. Again, deep characters and good writing, but this time in a different genre. It's one of my favorite books.

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  57. The Hunger Games and sequel Catching Fire by Suzanne Collins

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  58. Lois McMaster Bujold's Chalion series. Three books so far, two more to complete it. The Curse of Chalion; Paladin of Souls; The Hallowed Hunt.

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  59. Runemarks by Joanne Harris, The Bloody Jack adventures by L.A. Meyer, Airborn, Skybreaker, and Starclimber by Kenneth Oppel, anything by Tamora Pierce, The Bartimaeus Triology by Jonathan Stroud, I second the King Raven Trilogy, and the Pellinor series by Alison Croggon.

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  60. This may be something totally different than you generally read, but I've been trying to recommend it to people who I know love to read and love good books: Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner. It's a fairly simple story following the friendship that forms between two couples over four decades. Stegner's prose is beautiful and he has such great insights into life, especially about friendship. If you're wanting something different, you should give it a try. I'd never heard of this author a few weeks ago, and now Crossing to Safety has become one of my favorite books.

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  61. I will second the "His Dark Materials" trilogy by Phillip Pullman - great undertones of atheism and add the Aubrey-Maturin series by Patrick O'Brian - some of my favorite books.

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  62. Anything by Robin McKinley, but for similar world-building and politics, Chalice, and for adventure, The Blue Sword and The Hero and the Crown are best (but her fairy tale retellings are my favorites).

    Also, Garth Nix, especially The Abhorsen/Old Kingdom Books (start with Sabriel) and the Keys to the Kingdom series (start with Mister Monday).

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  63. The Chestry Oak by Kate Serendy.

    The story of a little prince living in Hungary before and during the Nazis invasion. Well written, unforgettable characters, and a lot of love.
    The boy's point of view is brilliantly described.

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  64. The Vorkosigan series by Lois McMaster Bujold

    Elizabeth E. Wein's series:
    The Winter Prince
    A Coalition of Lions
    The Sunbird
    The Lion Hunter
    The Empty Kingdom

    Catherine Gilbert Murdock's
    Dairy Queen
    The Off Season
    Front and Center

    Rosemary Sutcliff, particularly:
    The Eagle of the Ninth
    The Lantern Bearers
    The Shield Ring
    Warrior Scarlet
    Knight's Fee
    The Mark of the Horse Lord

    Sarah Dessen, particularly:
    Keeping the Moon a.k.a. Last Chance
    The Truth About Forever
    Just Listen
    Lock and Key

    Anything by Melina Marchetta

    Anything by Barry Lyga

    Terry Trueman's
    Stuck in Neutral
    Cruise Control

    Cynthia Voigt's Tillerman Cycle

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  65. AHHH! I've been off the computer for a couple days, and you're giving away a Megan Whalen Turner book?!

    I'd suggest Crown Duel, too. And Shannon Hale's Goose Girl. And Graceling and Fire. So, obviously, I don't have anything new to add. :-D

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  66. Like everyone else, I'd recommend Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosverse, but also anything Pratchett (more humor than MWT, but good characterization in the later books), and Diane Duane's So You Want To Be A Wizard series (Wizard's Holiday & Wizards at War being by far the best).

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  67. I'd say Tanya Huff's Valor books (Valor's Choice, The Better Part of Valor, Heart of Valor, Valor's Trial and a fifth book to come). They're sci-fi and a great deal more "genre-y" than MWT's stuff, but lovely none the less. They have interesting plots that include action, intrigue, romance, and one of the best main characters of all time. I don't know if I want to be Staff Sergeant Torin Kerr or marry her.

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  68. Anything by Rosemary Sutcliff or Diana Wynne Jones. My favorite books of theirs are The Lantern Bearers (Sutcliff) and Howl's Moving Castle (Wynne Jones).

    What a fantastic giveaway this is!

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  69. Seconding (or thirding) Sherwood Smith, Lois McMaster Bujold, Diana Wynne Jones, and Suzanne Collins (and tons of other aforementioned authors).

    For something unique, Good Omens by Terry Prachett and Neil Gaiman, and The Princess Bride by William Goldman. I think Gen and Wesley are quite similar.

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  70. So many of my authors have been taken... Diana Wynne Jones,Sherwood Smith, Patricia Mckillip, Robin Mckinley.
    Someone mentioned Patricia Wrede, but not the wondeful books she wrote in tandem with Caroline Stevermer. Sorcery and Cecilia, The Grand Tour and The Mislaid Magician. Also her own books, great reads in magic: A College Of Magics and A Scholar of Magics

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  71. I'd suggest THE UNNAMEABLES by Ellen Booraem. It's not quite as complex as Turner's stuff, but it still gives the reader a whole lot to think about while defying her expectations.

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  72. I'd have to add to the chorus of recommendations for Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus Trilogy and for Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan series. Several people have suggested newcomers to the Vorkosigan books to start with Cordelia's Honor, but I would suggest starting with Young Miles.

    I'd also have to recommend Nancy Farmer's books A Girl Named Disaster and The Eye, The Ear and The Arm for readers who like historical elements with a bit of supernatural intervention. I also read Ellen Raskin's The Westing Game many years ago and enjoyed the plot twist, though it's definitely written for younger readers.

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  73. I didn't see Jessica Day George's Dragon Slippers trilogy listed. Also, for some reason, Artemis Fowl comes to mind.

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  74. I recommend The Hollow Kingdom trilogy by Clare Dunkle. It's a delicious, fast read, with a strangely charismatic main character! Oh, and bless you a thousand times for giving away your ARC.

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  75. It's redundant already, but "The Lies of Locke Lamora" is excellent, and very much in a similar spirit to the Queen's Thief series (though it is definitely for older readers.) I actually found Queen's Thief while doing an internet search for the next Lamora book.

    And someone else has said this already too, but the "Temeraire" series is just wonderful.

    If you want something for younger readers, not exactly similar to Queen's Thief, but very clever and readable, I'd suggest "Letters from Camp", by Kate Klise. It's one of those books that sucked me in when I first read it, and still hooks me every time.

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  76. The Merlin Trilogy ("The Crystal Cave," "The Hollow Hills," and "The Last Enchantment") by Mary Stuart are excellent. Like Megan Whalen Turner, their (more overtly historical) setting feels very real, but also mythic. If you enjoyed Gen's interactions with the Gods, you might be interested in Merlin's experience of power.

    "The King Must Die" by Mary Renault held MANY echoes of the Queens Thief series for me. (It's a re-telling of the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur). The Hellenic setting, and Theseus's relationship with his gods, and the fall of Crete... actually the echo is probably the other way: perhaps this is one of Turner's influences. Theseus's experience of religion is fascinating!!

    And I second (third?) the His Dark Materials Trilogy by Pullman. One of the most subtle, fascinating, exciting, and meaningful works of literature I've ever read! It literally changed the way I see things...

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  77. The Merlin Trilogy ("The Crystal Cave," "The Hollow Hills," and "The Last Enchantment") by Mary Stuart are excellent. Like Megan Whalen Turner, their (more overtly historical) setting feels very real, but also mythic. If you enjoyed Gen's interactions with the Gods, you might be interested in Merlin's experience of power.

    "The King Must Die" by Mary Renault held MANY echoes of the Queens Thief series for me. (It's a re-telling of the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur). The Hellenic setting, and Theseus's relationship with his gods, and the fall of Crete... actually the echo is probably the other way: perhaps this is one of Turner's influences. Theseus's experience of religion is fascinating!!

    And I second (third?) the His Dark Materials Trilogy by Pullman. One of the most subtle, fascinating, exciting, and meaningful works of literature I've ever read! It literally changed the way I see things...

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  78. ~*MYSTIC AND RIDER*~ by Sharon Shinn =]

    this books is a story about adventure, friendship, and true love! A must read for any fan of the Thief Series!!!

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  79. So many of my favorite authors have been mentioned! I'm seconding all the recommendations for anything by Lois McMaster Bujold, Tamora Pierce, Patricia C. Wrede, Caroline Stevermer, Robin McKinley, and so many other authors!

    In fact, I can't think of any authors to add that haven't been mentioned, so I'll go with a books that has't been mentioned even if its author has: Princess Ben by Catherine Gilbert Murdoch. I enjoyed the witty voice, the complex characters, and the fairy tales turned on their heads.

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  80. It looks like its already been mentioned several times, but The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch was quite a good read. Locke, though a bit more rough around the edges and not as much of a loner, reminds me of Eugenides in his intelligence, daring and sassiness.

    And just because there's not a lot of love out there for it, I'm going to recommend Northlander by Meg Burden. Great debut novel with a sequel (The King Commands) coming out shortly.

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  81. I am going with the new Scott Westerfeld book, Leviathan, as my recommendation. Clever plots, brilliantly lovable characters. . .

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  82. I always recommend MWT's The Queen's Thief series when people ask for recommendations, so I am rather stumped at having to think of book recs for fans of MWT.

    I'd recommend Laurie R. King's Mary Russell series for wit; and Patricia C. Wrede's Mairelon the Magician and Diana Wynne Jones's Howl's Moving Castle for exasperating heroes. :)

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  83. I'd say the Howl's moving caslte series or... ... Ah! Too hard! Nothing compares to this series. But I'm always up to recommending the Books Of Bayern series by Shannon Hale.

    I'm SO excited for this book!

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  84. A couple more recs I have are...

    Heir Apparent
    A Wrinkle in Time
    A Great and Terrible Beauty
    The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle

    Thanks for having the contest :]

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  85. Most of my favorites have already been recommended (though I want to second Mckillip and Ellen Emerson White's books), but amazingly, the Lord Peter Wimsey books by Dorothy L. Sayers haven't been mentioned yet. It's a fantastic series, with twists and turns, a lot of comedy, and fantastic characters - I suspect anyone who loves Gen would also love Peter!

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  87. Dear Author charlotteslibrary.blogspot.com !
    I congratulate, a brilliant idea

    ReplyDelete

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